A Day in the Life of Marketing Intern at RPA Advertising- Cecelia Metzdorff

8During my senior year at DePaul, I have had the pleasure of working at RPA Advertising. RPA, a full-service advertising agency, is headquartered in sunny Santa Monica, CA with seven regional offices throughout the US. RPA has 725 full-time employees across all offices and our Chicago office has about 10 of those team members.  My position is as an Assistant Local Media Negotiator. If you’re like me when I first saw the job title, you’re probably wondering, what in the world does that mean?

Trust me, it’s not as complicated as it sounds. My role falls under the Local Media department, whose basic function is to negotiate TV and Radio airtime for our clients’ commercials. Some of RPA’s clients include Honda, Acura, La-Z-Boy, Dole Fruit, and apartments.com.

11In my position, I assist the Local Media Negotiators with the execution and maintenance of media schedules. After a schedule is negotiated and ordered with a station, the best-case scenario is that everything runs exactly as it was ordered. However, there are reasons the TV or radio station sometimes cannot air the spot. A few examples of why this would happen are scheduling changes, breaking news, a rain-out or overtime during a sporting event, a new special being added to the schedule, a program getting cancelled, or even the station overselling the time slot. The station will come back with their best “makegood”.  A “makegood” is an offer where the station will make the spot purchased (that is unable to air as ordered) good in another program and/or time-slot with equal or better ratings. One responsibility of my job is to negotiate and reject or approve makegoods. For example, the Local Media Negotiator purchases a 1030-second spot in the Big Bang Theory to air in May. As May approaches, the TV station changes their schedule and sees that The Big Bang Theory may not be airing that week. The station would send a makegood for Modern Family. In this situation, I would pull Nielsen demographic ratings and consider the client’s marketing objectives to make sure that Modern Family targets the same or a better audience than The Big Bang Theory. If it does, the makegood will be accepted. If it does not, the station will send me a new makegood for evaluation.

Another aspect of my role is processing the media billing. After the schedules run, RPA needs to pay the TV and radio stations.  One of my responsibilities is to make sure everything ran correctly and within client guidelines before payments are processed.  Sometimes the stations will remove spots or makegood spots without approval. In those cases, I communicate with the stations to find out what happened and if it can still be approved for payment. These are some of my major tasks; however, I have other tasks as assigned as well.

9Before starting at RPA, I didn’t know a lot about how the advertising world operates aside from what I learned watching Mad Men. My role has allowed me to learn a lot about how the industry works and get hands on experience doing work that keeps the agency successfully operating, rather than busy work or intern projects that never see the light of day. The culture is laid-back and everyone is very approachable with any questions. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my time at RPA and I’m proud of the work that the agency makes for our clients. It’s pretty cool knowing that your agency was responsible every time you see a Honda ad!

I encourage other Marketing majors to branch out from current notions of marketing roles and to try something new – I’m definitely glad I did!

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A Day in the Life of a United Airlines Intern- Michaela Hrbacek

I work for United Airlines as the Community Affairs Intern. The community affairs department focuses on building and maintaining partnerships with non-profits and building employee engagement and volunteering programs. Employee engagement in volunteering helps work culture, promotes team building and passionate community members, and most importantly benefits those served by volunteers.

United Airlines has over 82,000 employees living on 6 continents. The employees, as well as the customers, are global, which means always being respectful and culturally aware of those around you. There’s a huge variety of careers at United—there are pilots, flight attendants, operations & logistics, corporate support, and so many other roles. United wants their employees happy with the work they are doing, so moving around and changing career paths within the company is very popular and even encouraged.

As the intern in the department, I ran the Adventure Bear program, which is where groups of employees visit nearby children’s hospitals to distribute our Ben Flyin’ teddy bear and activity books. On top of that, I have aided in building out employee volunteer activities with local non-profits in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Houston, Denver, and Newark/New York.  My day-to-day activities usually include a lot of communications—I’m either on my e-mail or on the phone, talking with my coworkers in different regions around the U.S., or talking with outside organizations and coordinating events and programs for employees.

While I’m cooped behind a desk most of the time, I get to do really cool things out of the office as well. Just last week, I went to the American Cancer Society’s Discovery Ball Gala, which included huge companies like Boeing as well as political and celebrity figures like Rahm Emmanuel and James Corden. It’s really cool that I was able to go to the Gala, and sit second row, as an intern. We also do big volunteer events that I get to help logistically set up, and then execute day of. We did a food packaging event where almost 300,000 meals were packed by the top officers and executives at United. It was great to see their passion and commitment to underserved communities. It creates a great company culture, and definitely rubs off on the employees.

I’ve really enjoyed my position at United as a Community Affairs Intern. It’s been great to develop my communication skills—making sure I am concise and clear, getting all pertinent information out there without adding in confusing details. I’ve also been able to develop my skills with Microsoft Office, and most significantly, my excel skills. I’ve been able to work with many departments within the company—government affairs, environmental affairs, and PR, just to name a few. It’s nice to be able to network and create awesome opportunities. I’ve had a great experience so far, and look forward to continuing my work here. The flight benefits don’t hurt either.

A Day in the Life of a GYMGUYZ Intern- Jessica Genovese

I work for a company called GYMGUYZ. We are the leader’s in-Home Personal Training, and are committed to enhancing and changing the overall health and fitness of individuals worldwide. GYMGUYZ was founded in 2008 by Josh York, and the company had an immediate kick-off. To date, there are over 100 GYMGUYZ franchises in over 15 states, and we are currently working on opening a franchise in the U.K.

20While in the office, I search for different marketing events that we can display a booth at. I have to make sure that the events are affordable, realistic for us, and will be heavily populated. Negotiating booth pricing is also an important task, since our marketing budget is extremely low. Once my marketing events are booked, I go and attend these events with the goal of obtaining contact information from interested leads. After the marketing events, I call all of the leads and try to book them for our free assessment. Along with marketing events, I attend various amounts of Networking Events to try and build relationships with businesses. Once there is a relationship, I book a meeting to try and sell our Corporate Wellness Programs to their company.

I have learned a lot working here. I have learned how to create email campaigns, and how to tell which are successful or not. I have learned and became extremely comfortable with networking, and using networking to expand our business. My telemarketing skills have also improved with the high number of phone calls I conduct each week. Most of all, I have learned that “Success isn’t given, It’s Earned”. Working here and starting up a brand new company has taught me how difficult it is just to break even every month. I have taken into consideration how strategic you must be to earn business, and most importantly, retain business. I am very thankful for the opportunity to be able to lead a marketing team, and to learn the process of starting up a brand new company.

A Day in the Life of a Champ’SOL Sports Marketing Intern- Adija Brown

adija 2
Company: Champ’SOL Sports Marketing
Title: Sports Marketing and Entertainment Specialist
My day to day activities include an array of things. For example, social media, social media is an important part of marketing and I am responsible for going on our social networking sites and getting our name out there. I am also responsible for creating power points, sending emails and making calls to corporate sponsors to try and get our athlete clientele appearances.

Champ’SOL is not that large of a company but is one of the fastest growing companies in the city of Chicago. With locations in Chicago, New York, Orlando and the headquarters in Houston, TX, Champ’SOL is making a name for itself.

Adija and NBA Guard, Tony Allen who she met because of her internship with Champ'Sol

Adija and NBA Guard, Tony Allen who she met because of her internship with Champ’SOL

This experience to say the least is a great learning experience. What I am doing, learning and who I am surrounded by reflects my career aspirations so therefore it is everything I could ask for in terms of experience. The only thing that I would wish was that I could actually be in the atmosphere of the headquarters.  I am not In the Chicago office as much but would love to get more of those day to day hands on experience.

The Lettuce Entertain You Intern- Marlee Tumpich

LEYEAs an intern for one of the top well-known restaurant groups, I am one of the few in my LEYE intern class not focusing my studies on hospitality.  Soon to be entering my senior year at DePaul, I am studying marketing and economics for my undergraduate degree.  One of the biggest misconceptions of the restaurant industry is that it is not a real field to find or hold a career in.  I have been working in the industry for three years now and can tell you from my own experience that it is one of the best pools to dip your networking toes in.  My first piece of advice to any student on the lookout for an internship is to take a look at any companies they have worked for or work for currently.  There is a good chance you may find a quicker way to an intern position.  Having resources and references helps so much and can make the search much less stressful.

MarleeTumpich

Marlee (left) at work at RPM Italian

I have been working for LEYE since January 2012 when I started training for the opening of RPM Italian in downtown’s River North neighborhood right in the middle of all the action.  Since then, I have met countless important people and have gained an incredible amount of experience in a very high volume restaurant.  Upon learning about the company and their intern program, I reached out to my managers and some of the company’s partners to let them know of my interest in the summer intern program.  After applying and being accepted, I was ready and excited for the summer to begin.

Each intern is assigned an hourly position in one of LEYE’s many restaurants throughout the Chicagoland area or a position in the corporate office.  Since I already have been working as a hostess at RPM, I knew where I would be stationed for the summer.  Along with the hourly position, each week the interns meet once at the corporate office to take part in different seminars and listen to guest speakers from the company.  Everything from financials to social media marketing to culinary is discussed in our meetings. The interns are split up into groups and are assigned to come up with a restaurant concept from the ground up that they present to the LEYE partners at the end of summer.  The weekly meetings teach interns all the aspects that they should consider to incorporate into their projects.

In addition to the project and work tasks, interns are given a checklist of management responsibilities they have the option of learning about.  While interns are not required to complete everything on the list, it is in his or her own hands of how much he or she wants to experience and learn.  The more you involve yourself, the better the outcome of the internship as a whole.

A short run down of my day last week on a Tuesday began with an early start and ended later in the evening. First, I met my manager at RPM at 7 a.m. to shadow the opening manager shift.  We covered everything from the kitchen line check to food inventory to employee hours, schedules, and mapping out of the dinner shift later that evening.  After a long morning and afternoon, the interns met at RPM at 2:30 p.m. for our weekly meeting where the company architect/design coordinator spoke to us about his projects including a briefing on how RPM was created and designed.  Then, the groups were given some time during our meeting to discuss details and planning on our projects.  After the meeting ended at 5 p.m., I headed home to enjoy the rest of my day since I did not have to host that night at the restaurant.

The great thing about this internship is that it’s flexible enough, and each person can create what he or she wants out of it.  If you are interested in learning more about the industry or even just looking to gain some great experience, definitely check out Lettuce Entertain You’s website to learn more about the intern program or available positions within the company. There are currently over 100 restaurants in the company and well over 6,000 employees.  The progressive environment and great teams they build keep you on your toes and make for a great time.

The Colonie Intern- Lauren Cook

A Day in the Life: The Colonie Intern

the common area of the office

the common area of the office

I currently work for The Colonie, a creative commercial post-production house in downtown Chicago.  The Colonie works closely with advertising agencies, such as Leo Burnett, to edit together the commercials that we see on TV, web and mobile content, television shows, and documentaries   My position is intern. Unfortunately, I don’t have a long fancy title that is specific to one job. The Colonie is fairly small (compared to other businesses), only about fifteen people, but because of this, I get to do many different things within the company.

My day-to-day activities are always different. It typically depends on if a client is meeting with an editor or not. If there is a client, I take care of them; get them food, coffee, whatever they need. I also get to sit in on meetings while they discuss the commercial with the editor, and make changes.  That part is really cool because it is really interesting to see what the advertisers are looking for in the commercial. This could be if the actor said their line “genuinely” enough or what color the ad should end on.

the fancy deck room where I black tapes and put time code on them

the fancy deck room where I black tapes and put time code on them

When clients are not in, I get to do a variety of other things. I get to help my boss with “selects.” Selects are when you take the footage that you have received from the company, and pick out the best shots. I also get to use a fancy deck to “black” tapes, and put time code on them. This is useful so that the editors can have back-ups of the commercials that they have worked on.  On top of that, I also do sound effect and music searches.

I started working here at the beginning of January, and I have learned so much about the industry and technical things already.  While my internship is not specifically marketing related, I do feel as if I am learning about the advertising industry and how to market a company such as the one I work for. My experience will be extremely valuable for my future career development as I hope to go into a business like this, or as a marketing/digital person for a company some day.

my workspace

my workspace