A Day in the Life of an EXP Intern- Jaimie Thimmesh Rachie

Waking up to a blaring alarm at 4am, and another at 4:45, and yet another at 5:20. It’s kick-off day at EXP, which means the 7 people in our Air B&B have been up since the crack of dawn checking in student groups for flights.

EXP Trips is a student travel organization that leads groups of students on educational trips. They plan all aspects of the trip, and then meet the students and explore the city with them. Our last student trip was in Anaheim, California, where we led over 500 students on a 5 day trip. Every day at EXP is so different, but one of our most active and busy days was a perfect example of what it takes to be an EXP Intern.

4At around 6am, the TripHosts (people leading the trip) pile into our rental car, and head to the LAX airport to welcome some of our early groups. Bright neon shirts, sugar cookies in toe, and gigantic signs to help direct the students.

Once at the airport, we set up our display in the baggage claim area. Signs set up, bags on bags of t-shirts for the students, and signs set up, we are ready to welcome the students! We confirm their landing, check what carousel their bags will be arriving on, and call the bus company to make sure they are ready to be loaded. We will be at the airport for upwards of 6 hours, welcoming different groups. We split up into teams to tackle each group.

The students and teachers arrive to the baggage claim, and cautiously approach the neon-shirt crew. We are excited to see them and make them feel welcomed. We direct them with our gigantic signs (“Follow us!! (Unless you aren’t with EXP, that would be awkward!)”) to the idle bus, have them line up their bags, and quickly load up the bus for them. The bus goes to their hotel (where we have already called ahead to check in the group, and get their keys ready.)

We give the students about an hour to settle into their rooms and get ready for the day. Then we load back the bus, and bring the students to Huntington Beach. After three hours, we align the buses for pick-up do check-ins as each student loads the bus. Once we are on the bus, we hand out Angel’s tickets, and Angel’s hats for all the students.

We arrive at the game and have the students text a number. This number allows us to easily send a mass text to all the students to let them know where the bus will be, when we are leaving, and any other important information that needs to be conveyed.

After the game, we load the students and send them back to their hotel. We give the teachers the itinerary for the next day and let them on be on their way.

The EXP TripHost team meets back at the Air B&B and goes over the entire schedule for the next day. It is a busy day as it is filled with lots of logistics and communication, but it is so fun!

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A Day in the Life of a UPshow Intern- Aida Moradi

13When you are looking for an internship, do you immediately glance over the job description and quietly in your head read, “grunt work?” Well, I did. I knew that if I applied for my first internship, I should just anticipate going on plenty of coffee runs and doing things that had little to nothing to do with the field I was interested in. Once I walked into UPshow, seeing that it was a laid-back start-up company with a social media mural on disply right when you walk into the office and white picnic tables instead of real tables, I realized that I might be wrong about my assumption.

The day I was hired, I was given the title, “Client Success Manager.” Such a prestigious label for a freshly hired intern! With only 25 people working for UPshow, I just assumed they didn’t already have that position filled so I gladly took the fancy title. The first few weeks at UPshow, I was given the tasks of creating spotlights and surveys for our clients. The spotlights are for their televisions in their bars that highlight certain events they host, such as Trivia Night or Happy Hour. I would go and creep around on the specific bar or restaurants’ social media pages to find out what events they are not utilizing for our spotlight feature. Then I would create the spotlight and apply it to their televisions right from my laptop in the office.

12After a short while, I was told to “scrap that” and start doing something else. I showed a slight interest in learning data analytics, so my boss wanted me to get started right away! I was given all the tools to figure out the data for each client and how they are doing each day, week, month, and year with our product. I now create leaderboards and case studies for certain clients that we want to, “tell the best story” to in order to keep them as a regular client. These are clients that want to see how UPshow is benefitting them. A leaderboard is for a client that has multiple locations or branches, and I create a presentation with each of their data analytics. A case study is for singular clients that want to see their data in terms of the past 3 months and 6 months, as well as overall data. Basically, all this data is showing our clients that we can get them more customers into their venues, and this will lend itself to increasing their sales.

What I have taken from this internship is that a start-up is a lot of work. Each individual working for UPshow wears multiple hats. Everyone needs to be skilled in how to manage roughly each aspect of the company. Each of us should know how to create social media content, create accounts, package and ship boxes, data analytics, customer service, and of course, knowing how to use the product. I have learned about the more creative side to marketing, where I had to create spotlights on Canva. I also had to learn the more numbers focused portion of marketing with all the data analytics. I have even learned about some tools that businesses use in order to keep their company running, such as, Sales Force. This internship has helped me understand marketing a little better, and how it encompasses many different aspects of sales.

Tribune Media Intern- Fernando Martinez

Tribune Tower

Where I work!

The alarm clock goes off, I get dressed for my internship, take the train into the Loop, pick up my morning Starbucks, and walk through the gold-lined revolving doors of the Chicago Tribune’s Tribune Tower, a stone building dating back to 1925. After scanning my security badge at the front desk, I take the stairs up to the second floor and walk down the hallway to sit at my desk, joining the rest of the marketing team. The first thing I always see when I walk to my desk is my nameplate,

“Fernando Martinez, Advertiser Marketing Intern.”

In a normal day, a typical advertiser marketing intern such as myself can go to one or more meetings, use a few different syndicated data tools, and even have some creative fun with putting together some ad sell sheets. Every day different members of the team go into meetings with clients that are small to medium size business owners, and sales team representatives. Interns get asked to sit in on them to find out more about the needs of clients who want to advertise with publications of the Chicago Tribune, and getting the chance to ask the clients questions that could help with their solutions. Once all the right information is collected, you will use several different tools to pull syndicated data.

My desk!

My desk aka data central!

Such data can range from the population of a certain radius in the city to demographic information down to the finest specification. The amount of data that can be pulled is huge, and it never ceases to amaze me how specific I can get. One of the fun parts of my internship comes from creating the sell sheets that the sales reps can take back to the clients, which will ultimately seal the deal with the client. The sales rep may have done a great job selling the goods to the client, but it’s up to the advertiser marketing team member to pull the right data and tell the story in a way that would compel the client to advertise in the Chicago Tribune.

Chicago Tribune, a division of Tribune Media Group, ranked eighth largest newspaper in the country by daily circulation, and owners of several radio and TV stations, along with other newspaper such as the Los Angeles Times. Currently the Tribune Media Group is in charge of the advertiser marketing needs for twenty-five different publications, gaining an annual revenue ranging from five to thirteen million dollars. The immediate team itself consists of another intern, ten full-time employees, and myself.

cake for RedEye birthday

One of the perks- cake day in celebration of the RedEye 10th Birthday!

Anyone who asks me how I like my internship, I answer the same way; “I love it.” At first I didn’t know what I was getting myself into when I applied to it, but after being there for a while and getting the hang of things, I really enjoy what I’m doing. I get to learn so many aspects of marketing every day. I’ve learned things that range from using technical computer programs to pull large amounts of data on just about anything, to learning how to effectively tell a story using that same information. Every day I feel like I learn at least one thing that I never knew before, and probably wouldn’t have learned it had I never got an internship with the Chicago Tribune’s Tribune Media Group.