A Day in the Life of an EXP Intern- Jaimie Thimmesh Rachie

Waking up to a blaring alarm at 4am, and another at 4:45, and yet another at 5:20. It’s kick-off day at EXP, which means the 7 people in our Air B&B have been up since the crack of dawn checking in student groups for flights.

EXP Trips is a student travel organization that leads groups of students on educational trips. They plan all aspects of the trip, and then meet the students and explore the city with them. Our last student trip was in Anaheim, California, where we led over 500 students on a 5 day trip. Every day at EXP is so different, but one of our most active and busy days was a perfect example of what it takes to be an EXP Intern.

4At around 6am, the TripHosts (people leading the trip) pile into our rental car, and head to the LAX airport to welcome some of our early groups. Bright neon shirts, sugar cookies in toe, and gigantic signs to help direct the students.

Once at the airport, we set up our display in the baggage claim area. Signs set up, bags on bags of t-shirts for the students, and signs set up, we are ready to welcome the students! We confirm their landing, check what carousel their bags will be arriving on, and call the bus company to make sure they are ready to be loaded. We will be at the airport for upwards of 6 hours, welcoming different groups. We split up into teams to tackle each group.

The students and teachers arrive to the baggage claim, and cautiously approach the neon-shirt crew. We are excited to see them and make them feel welcomed. We direct them with our gigantic signs (“Follow us!! (Unless you aren’t with EXP, that would be awkward!)”) to the idle bus, have them line up their bags, and quickly load up the bus for them. The bus goes to their hotel (where we have already called ahead to check in the group, and get their keys ready.)

We give the students about an hour to settle into their rooms and get ready for the day. Then we load back the bus, and bring the students to Huntington Beach. After three hours, we align the buses for pick-up do check-ins as each student loads the bus. Once we are on the bus, we hand out Angel’s tickets, and Angel’s hats for all the students.

We arrive at the game and have the students text a number. This number allows us to easily send a mass text to all the students to let them know where the bus will be, when we are leaving, and any other important information that needs to be conveyed.

After the game, we load the students and send them back to their hotel. We give the teachers the itinerary for the next day and let them on be on their way.

The EXP TripHost team meets back at the Air B&B and goes over the entire schedule for the next day. It is a busy day as it is filled with lots of logistics and communication, but it is so fun!

Advertisements

A Day in The Life of a Consolidated Concepts Intern- Torey Gostek

Diving into the professional work environment, you must start somewhere. Although I’ve had previous exposure to the marketing industry working for another company independently, I’ve never worked in a professional office setting on a team, as a Sales and Marketing Analyst Intern.  The company I’m interning for is called Consolidated Concepts. It is part of a family of companies, under the name “Emerging,” that elevate restaurant and entertainment concepts to be among the top in the industry. Although I help all four companies under Emerging, I spend most of my time working for Consolidated Concepts, which optimizes supply chain for restaurants across the nation. The company employs around 100 people altogether but the office in Chicago, being very small, has only 20.

5A lot of my time involves researching new restaurant chains in which our supply chain optimization can be implemented. While searching for leads, I can be creative. Aside from looking in our data bases, there are numerous news sites or blogs that mention chains that align with our lead qualification criteria. We also discovered that we can get leads through alert messages which warns us of restaurant chains that are emerging, growing, merging, etc. Utilizing these alerts, has allowed us to place the ones that meet our criteria into a trigger-event campaign. This essentially means placing the customer into a specific email workflow, depending on whether they are a client or potential client. We use Marketo as the marketing automation software which helps send these email-triggered-events and it creates the workflows to engage customers and prospects. The process is efficient because it reaches over 200 leads every couple of weeks with one click of a button, while rest of the process is automated until a lead becomes qualified. Then, it’s up to the Sales Representative to take that qualified lead.

I’m working on another major project directly with the President of Emerging. We are putting together a blog that educates and inspires restaurant operators and C-Level Executives in areas such as real estate, data intelligence, cost reduction, and beverage education. The goal of this blog is not only to become the leader in educating emerging restaurants, but to gain more leads and obviously boost business. Along with writing white papers for the blog and interviewing c-level executives, I am learning about the marketing automation process for blogs as well. We are using HubSpot as our blogging platform. HubSpot is an inbound marketing and sales software that helps companies attract visitors, convert leads, and close business. I can’t wait to see what new business our blog brings in.

A Day in the Life of a UPshow Intern- Aida Moradi

13When you are looking for an internship, do you immediately glance over the job description and quietly in your head read, “grunt work?” Well, I did. I knew that if I applied for my first internship, I should just anticipate going on plenty of coffee runs and doing things that had little to nothing to do with the field I was interested in. Once I walked into UPshow, seeing that it was a laid-back start-up company with a social media mural on disply right when you walk into the office and white picnic tables instead of real tables, I realized that I might be wrong about my assumption.

The day I was hired, I was given the title, “Client Success Manager.” Such a prestigious label for a freshly hired intern! With only 25 people working for UPshow, I just assumed they didn’t already have that position filled so I gladly took the fancy title. The first few weeks at UPshow, I was given the tasks of creating spotlights and surveys for our clients. The spotlights are for their televisions in their bars that highlight certain events they host, such as Trivia Night or Happy Hour. I would go and creep around on the specific bar or restaurants’ social media pages to find out what events they are not utilizing for our spotlight feature. Then I would create the spotlight and apply it to their televisions right from my laptop in the office.

12After a short while, I was told to “scrap that” and start doing something else. I showed a slight interest in learning data analytics, so my boss wanted me to get started right away! I was given all the tools to figure out the data for each client and how they are doing each day, week, month, and year with our product. I now create leaderboards and case studies for certain clients that we want to, “tell the best story” to in order to keep them as a regular client. These are clients that want to see how UPshow is benefitting them. A leaderboard is for a client that has multiple locations or branches, and I create a presentation with each of their data analytics. A case study is for singular clients that want to see their data in terms of the past 3 months and 6 months, as well as overall data. Basically, all this data is showing our clients that we can get them more customers into their venues, and this will lend itself to increasing their sales.

What I have taken from this internship is that a start-up is a lot of work. Each individual working for UPshow wears multiple hats. Everyone needs to be skilled in how to manage roughly each aspect of the company. Each of us should know how to create social media content, create accounts, package and ship boxes, data analytics, customer service, and of course, knowing how to use the product. I have learned about the more creative side to marketing, where I had to create spotlights on Canva. I also had to learn the more numbers focused portion of marketing with all the data analytics. I have even learned about some tools that businesses use in order to keep their company running, such as, Sales Force. This internship has helped me understand marketing a little better, and how it encompasses many different aspects of sales.

A Day in the Life of a United Airlines Intern- Michaela Hrbacek

I work for United Airlines as the Community Affairs Intern. The community affairs department focuses on building and maintaining partnerships with non-profits and building employee engagement and volunteering programs. Employee engagement in volunteering helps work culture, promotes team building and passionate community members, and most importantly benefits those served by volunteers.

United Airlines has over 82,000 employees living on 6 continents. The employees, as well as the customers, are global, which means always being respectful and culturally aware of those around you. There’s a huge variety of careers at United—there are pilots, flight attendants, operations & logistics, corporate support, and so many other roles. United wants their employees happy with the work they are doing, so moving around and changing career paths within the company is very popular and even encouraged.

As the intern in the department, I ran the Adventure Bear program, which is where groups of employees visit nearby children’s hospitals to distribute our Ben Flyin’ teddy bear and activity books. On top of that, I have aided in building out employee volunteer activities with local non-profits in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Houston, Denver, and Newark/New York.  My day-to-day activities usually include a lot of communications—I’m either on my e-mail or on the phone, talking with my coworkers in different regions around the U.S., or talking with outside organizations and coordinating events and programs for employees.

While I’m cooped behind a desk most of the time, I get to do really cool things out of the office as well. Just last week, I went to the American Cancer Society’s Discovery Ball Gala, which included huge companies like Boeing as well as political and celebrity figures like Rahm Emmanuel and James Corden. It’s really cool that I was able to go to the Gala, and sit second row, as an intern. We also do big volunteer events that I get to help logistically set up, and then execute day of. We did a food packaging event where almost 300,000 meals were packed by the top officers and executives at United. It was great to see their passion and commitment to underserved communities. It creates a great company culture, and definitely rubs off on the employees.

I’ve really enjoyed my position at United as a Community Affairs Intern. It’s been great to develop my communication skills—making sure I am concise and clear, getting all pertinent information out there without adding in confusing details. I’ve also been able to develop my skills with Microsoft Office, and most significantly, my excel skills. I’ve been able to work with many departments within the company—government affairs, environmental affairs, and PR, just to name a few. It’s nice to be able to network and create awesome opportunities. I’ve had a great experience so far, and look forward to continuing my work here. The flight benefits don’t hurt either.

Let’s Dissect the Intern

Let’s think1 of it as the best game of Operation: I do not buzz, except for when the phone rings nor I do not have plastic pieces that need to be taken out of my body. Although, every part of me is essential to being the Marketing Communications Intern in the DePaul Community and Government Relations Office. I will work from the bottom up, and as I get closer to the top the more you will know about the life of an intern.

Feet and legs, they go together naturally. Without these how do I get to work? I walk in through the revolving door, step onto the elevator and rise to the 19th floor. I walk into our office of six, sometimes seven, and take a seat to get right to work. These feet and legs have dashed to make copies, stood up to greet guests, crossed to take on an important meeting, and leaped to shake President Obama’s hand. Yes, my feet and legs needed to move to be the intern.3

Hands and arms, similar to feet and legs, yet even more involved. They type away on the keyboard when fact checking, editing websites, designing graphics, pressing send on emails, and compiling data. These hands also write newsletters, put together meeting folders, prepare for research initiatives, shake hands with public figures, and wave hello and see you tomorrow each day.

Mouth, it is necessary to communicate when being an intern. I say hello when I enter the office, I answer phones, I talk with community members, I converse with consular generals, and I check in with my other fellow intern. There are two of us and we cannot do our jobs without consistent communication. We work together and need to know what the other is working on in order to accomplish all we do. We work in tandem, and communication is key to making our office run as smoothly as it does.

Eyes and ears, I see and listen to a lot as an intern. I see spreadsheets, I look at reports, I review articles, and I make eye contact when communicating face to face with coworkers, community members, and public figures. These ears hear conversations, listen to important speeches, understand new concepts, and listen to feedback. These eyes get tired on occasion, and sometimes strained from looking at a computer screen, yet these eyes also get to see a President make his first speech back form vacation, see a project come to life in a community wide event, get to see and listen to people come together to help the entire city understand violence and come up with solutions towards improvement. These eyes and ears see and hear a lot, and are essential to never miss a beat.

2Heart, probably the most important part of being an intern is being passionate about the work I do each day, which comes from this beating organ in the middle of my chest. I am passionate about helping others, I am inspired when I hear motivational speakers, and I am driven when I research a cause reach out to. Passion is something I need to find in everything I do in order to have meaning and fulfillment in each endeavor I take pursue. All these experiences drive my passion to do what must be done as an intern.

A Day in the Life of a Motorola Solutions Marketing Intern–Ahmed Alawami

alawami1It was an exciting moment when I received a call last March from Motorola Solutions, Inc. to invite me for an interview for an available marketing internship opportunity over the summer. The hiring manager told me that after she reviewed my resume and application, she thought that I had the right academic background and experience mixture she was looking for. She needed a candidate who is a graduate student in marketing but who also has an IT background and can understand complex technological offerings. Prior to joining DePaul, and after I graduated with my bachelor’s in Information Science, I worked for couple of years in sales and consultation for an IT firm.

Motorola Solutions, Inc., based in Schaumburg, IL, serves the Government and Enterprise segments by designing, manufacturing, and selling communications infrastructure, devices, system software, and applications. It has about 22,000 employees around the globe and is one of the two companies that were born after the original Motorola, Inc. split in 2011. Motorola Solutions, which is the legal successor, sold its mobile business to Google, Inc. which formed a new company, based in Chicago, IL, called Motorola Mobility.

ASTRO 25 is Motorola Solutions’ core of public safety mission critical communication systems. It is the radio system used by first responders like firefighters, police officers and 911 dispatchers to communicate. Being the ASTRO Marketing Intern, I spend 80% of my time with the Global Product Management team within the System Infrastructure Operations unit, and the remaining 20% with the Global Product Marketing team.

alawamiFour days of the week, I meet with product managers and research from various resources to collect information and create new Go-To-Market material, or update old ones that no longer have valid information due to feature changes due to system updates. I find the most fun in creating new GTM material because, especially for my first project, there are valued offerings that the market is not aware of, and having GTM material for these offerings available to sales teams, means better sales opportunities and greater revenue.

Once a week, I work with the Global Product Marketing team. With this team, I learn about various marketing efforts purely run by the team. I learn about best practices to prepare for new product launches like creating brochures, multimedia and webpages. I also learn about plans and preparations prior to major exhibitions from organizing the products for display to testing the demo units. One more very interesting skill I’m learning with this team is the depth of thoughts that go in creating GTM material, not in terms of design, but in terms of information. What information goes in the material, to whom it will be presented, who will use it and when in the lifecycle of the product it will be used are just a small sample of the questions that are discussed prior to creating new GTM material and when reviewing and updating new ones.

A Day in the Life of a PepsiCo Category Management Intern- Nina Bulat

Category Management Intern at PepsiCoPepsicoBuilding-Chicago-00907-004a

PepsiCo – did over $66 billion in revenue in 2013, food and beverage portfolio that consists of 22
brands that each did over $1 billion in estimated annual retail sales in 2013

Day-to-Day Activities:

As a Category Management Intern my daily activities varied depending on what portion of my project I was working on. On a typical day, I would arrive at the office by 7:30AM and the first thing I would do is check my emails. This was always first on my list because if there was something important such as a calendar invite for that day or an email that required immediate action, I wanted to make sure I responded as soon as possible.

At the beginning of my internship, after checking emails I would normally begin pulling data from multiple sources to collaborate for my project. With the data I would conduct analyses utilizing different mathematical formulas in order to find out measures such as dollar opportunity, share of wallet, etc. Aside from collecting and analyzing data in order to apply it toward my project, I needed use those findings and recreate them in a visually appealing way in order to present it out in what is referred to as a ‘deck’.  A deck is just another word for a power point presentation.

Another part of my day was scheduling and attending connects. Connects are one on one meetings that are set-up in order to network, further your understanding of the business, and get a different perspective on other divisions within PepsiCo. Personally I did over 25 connects throughout the duration of my internship with people across various channels of PepsiCo I met with people from Space, Strategy, Supply Chain, Marketing, etc. which also included different brands within PepsiCo’s portfolio (i.e. Quaker, Gatorade, etc.).

Also, even though I had a project that I was working on, there would be times where I would need to pull data for my manager or update data in an existing deck. It all depended on what was going on or what needed to be done, but there was always something to be doing it was just a matter of what. A few other day-to-day activities included scheduled meetings with my manager or impromptu meetings with my mentor or other co-workers/interns. Grabbing lunch with fellow interns and/or co-workers was also something that was a frequent occurrence.

PepsiCo Chairman Indra Nooyi Speaks At Investor MeetingAdditional Activities: Aside from everyday functions within my internship, there were a number of other things I did while interning at PepsiCo. I joined an ‘ERG’ which is an Employee Resource Group, attended three different plant tours (two beverage and one food), did community service with other Chicago-based interns at the Greater Chicago Food Depository, and doing a merchandiser route ride. A merchandiser route ride is where you go to different stores; I went to Walmart and Jewel, and stock/re-stock shelves and coolers with PepsiCo products.

A Day in the Life of the ACH Food Company Intern- Matt Zaruba

My name is Matt Zaruba. I’m a going to be a senior at DePaul University and I’m pursuing a degree in marketing with a concentration in sale leadership and I am also minoring in management. This summer I’m interning at a company called ACH Food Companies, Inc. ACH Food is a consumer packaged goods company and is a child company of Associated British Foods Inc. (ABF). ACH Food has many brands under its name, brands such as; Mazola Cooking Oil, Fleischmann’s yeast, Weber Grill seasonings, and many more. ACH Food Companies, Inc is located in Oakbrook Terrace, IL and is located in the Parkview Plaza.

Here is Matt's desk!

Here is Matt’s desk!

I will be working in the marketing department and will be assuming the duties of an assistant brand manager for the various brands and products that ACH Food produces. My day to day activities vary on most days but there are some routine duties I fulfill every day. On a typical day I will come into the office and will pull data from Information Resources Inc. (IRI) and analyze it. When analyzing the data I’m looking for trends or information that will help tell the story of a product in the market; whether it be showing growth in a specific region or seeing where there is a pricing sensitivity to the market. But like most jobs, there are various other activities that I’m engaged in at a work. For example one day I attended a focus group study in Chicago to see how well our commercials conveyed the message of our product. Other days I help the assistant brand managers with working on creative free standing inserts (FSI) and packaging for some of the new products that will be launching soon.  I also have been engaged in several sales meetings as well as segmentation and advertising meetings.

ACH Food Companies, Inc. is a relatively big company with 500-1000 employees working in the various locations throughout North America. There are corporate buildings in Illinois, Tennessee, Iowa and Mexico. ACH Food packages consumer goods for sale to business retailers and they also manufacture some of the brands that they own such as Mazola cooking oils. The main manufacturing plant for ACH Food is in Ankeny, Iowa.

Here is a focus group from Chicago!

Here is a focus group from Chicago!

So far working at ACH Food has been an amazing experience. I was nervous to start working in such a large office but I was give good direction and help by my co-workers. I was surprised the amount of responsibility and trust that my superiors and co-workers have given me and I have learned a lot of vital lessons from that. Working in as an assistant brand manager has helped point me in the direction of where I want to take my future career. I am learning a lot of professional skills from my co-workers and how to deal with clients and other professionals with troubling situations. I have also gained a lot of knowledge on the field of marketing in many ways ranging from advertising, sales, category management, packaging and many more.

A Day in the Life of the Prudential Rubloff Properties’ Intern- Tania Hollander

A Day in the Life of a Prudential Rubloff Intern

Hello all! My name is Tania Hollander and I am an intern for the marketing department at Prudential Rubloff Properties. In 2009 two centers of real estate, Rubloff Residential Properties and Prudential Preferred Properties, merged together to form what is know today as Prudential Rubloff Properties. Since then, Prudential Rubloff Properties has grown and prospered into one of the leading real estate firms in the Chicagoland area.

My day at the office beings at 9:30am, but I always check my work email while walking to the office to make sure I am caught up on anything I might have missed over the weekend. As I only work Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday things occasionally come up on Friday and Mondays and I like to be ready when I walk in Tuesday morning. I usually have an email from my manager on what she would like me to work on for the day, but if not I stop by her desk first to see if there is a top priority task I must complete. If not, I head on over to my desk to start my computer and get ready for the day!

My day-to-day tasks are a bit confusing to explain to someone who is not in real estate but I’ll give it a try! Once my computer is up and running, the first thing I always do is make sure I have no new eCard requests from the agents who I assist. ECard’s are simple virtual mailing cards that I create for agents upon request. The eCards are quick and easy to make, but I always want to make sure the agents approve them before I send them out, which is the time consuming part. After checking for any new requests, I next look to see if I need to update any of the homes listings, prices and photos online through our internal database. It’s fairly simple but as there as so many homes being sold it can take a long time! After I complete those tasks, I have pending projects that I must attend to that range from creating a blog post for Prudential Rubloff’s blog or drafting a social media content plan for their Facebook and Twitter account.

Prudential Rubloff Properties has fourteen different offices located throughout Cook, Lake and DuPage County. Chicago alone has six different offices! I work at the ‘Mag Mile’ office, which is also known as the corporate office on Michigan Avenue. Today, Prudential Rubloff has grown to become a leading real estate manager in Chicago and has nearly 850 sales professionals and staff. It has grown quite a lot since 2007!

So far my internship has been great! Not only have I met many new and nice people, but also I have learned that there is much to real estate that I had not known about before. Also, working in the corporate office I have learned that there is much that goes on that is not seen with the plain eye. My internship has provided me with the inside look into how a business is run and has given me much more respect for people who have the usual ‘desk job’. I still have a month left to go and cannot wait to see what else I learn!

Prudential Rubloff is now hiring interns, if you want to apply send your resume to ksteven6@depaul.edu

The Channel IQ Intern- Phillip Moss

working

The setup at Channel IQ

Hello, my name is Phillip Moss and I am a Data analyst Intern at Channel IQ. Channel IQ is a marketing research company that focuses on data analytics. Channel IQ is an up-and coming company in the field of e-commerce. Our company looks at product and pricing data and creates specialized reports for our client companies.

Phillipatwork

Phillip at his desk, working as a Research Analyst Intern

A typical day for me involves arriving at work at 9am and checking in with 3 account managers. I work part time for 16 hours a week so I don’t have an assigned account manager. Full time data analysts are given a specific account manager. I receive a client from one of the account managers (Go Pro cameras for example) and I would go to my computer station and log onto OnRamp. OnRamp is a program that we use to search the internet for the product pages that our client’s products are distributed on. We check to make sure that the company’s minimum advertised price (MAP) is being honored by other companies. Our job is to match the products online with the actual products that the client lists and to remove information that is irrelevant to the client. We focus on three main websites: Amazon, EBay, and Google. Each account can have anywhere from 100 to a few thousand products. I can go through 1 to 3 product accounts a day, depending on the amount of results that the program pulls for a given product. I have a lunch break in between at 12 each day. I can ask questions at any time, which I had to do a lot in the beginning as I became knowledgeable of both the program and the ways each account manager wanted the reports to be at the end of the process. I also do quality control for the accounts, making sure that the computer accurately collected the data after I matched it.

deskChannel IQ is a growing company. It has about 40 workers. It is difficult to know exactly how many workers are actually there because some individuals work remotely. We have two different departments, the technology department is on the 6th floor and the business operations section is on the 7th floor. All workers can communicate with each other through a program called “Pigeon” which allows for instant messaging. It is very effective in connecting the two floors and allowing each department to stay in touch with day-to-day operations.

I have learned a lot from this internship. I like generating reports for client companies. I also learned a lot about e-commerce pricing policies. I own an eBay business and seeing how companies manage online distributers was very interesting. I believe that my business will be able to grow as a result of the processes that I learned in this internship. Channel IQ also taught me to use analytical skills to make key decisions. I love working here!