A Day in the Life of Marketing Intern at RPA Advertising- Cecelia Metzdorff

8During my senior year at DePaul, I have had the pleasure of working at RPA Advertising. RPA, a full-service advertising agency, is headquartered in sunny Santa Monica, CA with seven regional offices throughout the US. RPA has 725 full-time employees across all offices and our Chicago office has about 10 of those team members.  My position is as an Assistant Local Media Negotiator. If you’re like me when I first saw the job title, you’re probably wondering, what in the world does that mean?

Trust me, it’s not as complicated as it sounds. My role falls under the Local Media department, whose basic function is to negotiate TV and Radio airtime for our clients’ commercials. Some of RPA’s clients include Honda, Acura, La-Z-Boy, Dole Fruit, and apartments.com.

11In my position, I assist the Local Media Negotiators with the execution and maintenance of media schedules. After a schedule is negotiated and ordered with a station, the best-case scenario is that everything runs exactly as it was ordered. However, there are reasons the TV or radio station sometimes cannot air the spot. A few examples of why this would happen are scheduling changes, breaking news, a rain-out or overtime during a sporting event, a new special being added to the schedule, a program getting cancelled, or even the station overselling the time slot. The station will come back with their best “makegood”.  A “makegood” is an offer where the station will make the spot purchased (that is unable to air as ordered) good in another program and/or time-slot with equal or better ratings. One responsibility of my job is to negotiate and reject or approve makegoods. For example, the Local Media Negotiator purchases a 1030-second spot in the Big Bang Theory to air in May. As May approaches, the TV station changes their schedule and sees that The Big Bang Theory may not be airing that week. The station would send a makegood for Modern Family. In this situation, I would pull Nielsen demographic ratings and consider the client’s marketing objectives to make sure that Modern Family targets the same or a better audience than The Big Bang Theory. If it does, the makegood will be accepted. If it does not, the station will send me a new makegood for evaluation.

Another aspect of my role is processing the media billing. After the schedules run, RPA needs to pay the TV and radio stations.  One of my responsibilities is to make sure everything ran correctly and within client guidelines before payments are processed.  Sometimes the stations will remove spots or makegood spots without approval. In those cases, I communicate with the stations to find out what happened and if it can still be approved for payment. These are some of my major tasks; however, I have other tasks as assigned as well.

9Before starting at RPA, I didn’t know a lot about how the advertising world operates aside from what I learned watching Mad Men. My role has allowed me to learn a lot about how the industry works and get hands on experience doing work that keeps the agency successfully operating, rather than busy work or intern projects that never see the light of day. The culture is laid-back and everyone is very approachable with any questions. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my time at RPA and I’m proud of the work that the agency makes for our clients. It’s pretty cool knowing that your agency was responsible every time you see a Honda ad!

I encourage other Marketing majors to branch out from current notions of marketing roles and to try something new – I’m definitely glad I did!

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A Day in the Life of a Motorola Solutions Intern- Nicole Jackson

aInterning for a company like Motorola Solutions, a big fortune 500 company, in the heart of the city, on Michigan Ave., and across from the bean, has been an amazing experience for me. Motorola Solutions, a publically traded company, is a relatively large company, with 14,000 employees in 60 countries. Obtaining this opportunity, along with being in a program with 5 other inside sales interns, and working alongside over 100 other interns in every department from across North America, has been the perfect scenario for my summer.

I will bring you along my personal guided tour of a day in the life as a North America-Inside Sales intern for Motorola Solutions.

I personally prefer to get into the office early, sat 8am, this allows me to leave by 4pm. Other interns that are not morning people, prefer to get in at 9am and then leave at 5pm. Motorola Solutions has three offices in Illinois, the headquarters for the company is in Schaumburg where all the interns are except a few. The Michigan Ave office is the sales office, you may be familiar with this office because of the huge letters on top of the building that read “MOTOROLA” this is my office. On the seventh floor, in the far corner is where the six of us sit, each in our own little cubicle, with little name tags that read our names, “interns”, and then a picture of our school mascot. This was pretty exciting on the first day, along with receiving desk phones, laptops, and badges. Each of us are assigned to a mentor, a full time employee within inside sales. This is beneficial in so many ways. My mentor is amazing, she constantly checks up on me, advises me on what I should be doing, and truly just wants for me to be successful in obtaining a full time position at the end, and make me feel welcome.

I  got a little off topic discussing more of the background information on the internship, but back to my day to day activities.  First, I like to start my day off “Data Mining” this allows me to get in groove of working. We are sent an excel spreadsheet of anywhere from 100-1000 names of community colleges, police/fire stations, hospitals, anywhere really that would use two-way radios. We then look up the place, find a contact and import the name, email, phone, and website into the excel spreadsheet. I usually do this till about 12:30, this is when we all go out to lunch together. After lunch, I switch it up to a different activity called “CallWorks Campaign” this is where we are given another spreadsheet, and we call the same type of places, ask to speak to whoever is in charge of security communications, and gage interest on wanting to be connected with an inside sales rep to learn more about Motorola Solutions products, such as two-way radios, batteries, accessories, and body cameras. Although, I have previously worked in an environment where I had to make basic sales calls, I am learning more about different approaches on how to tackle sales calls. I do this till 4pm, where I then pack up my computer and go home.

Lastly, I will cover the random events that we, as interns get to attend. Once a week we have a “lunch and learn” where the head of each department such as finance, HR, marketing etc. come in and talk to us about their job, how they got to where they are, their specific department, and product overview. Lunch and learns, are of course where they cater a variety of food. Other special events that we do throughout the 12 week program, are go on the odyssey cruise for lunch and a tour of the city, volunteer for American Red Cross, fand visit the cook county 911 dispatch center, where we will learn more about products and implementation. Lastly, another intern and I, got chosen last week to volunteer at a Motorola Solutions sponsored golf event in Barrington, which is coming up this week. At the end of the internship, all of us have final interviews, where they tell us if they are going to offer us a full time position after graduating.  That is the extent of my 12 week internship at Motorola Solutions,  definitely an amazing company, in which, I hope to continue full-time this December, after my last trimester.

A Day in the Life of a Motorola Solutions Marketing Intern–Ahmed Alawami

alawami1It was an exciting moment when I received a call last March from Motorola Solutions, Inc. to invite me for an interview for an available marketing internship opportunity over the summer. The hiring manager told me that after she reviewed my resume and application, she thought that I had the right academic background and experience mixture she was looking for. She needed a candidate who is a graduate student in marketing but who also has an IT background and can understand complex technological offerings. Prior to joining DePaul, and after I graduated with my bachelor’s in Information Science, I worked for couple of years in sales and consultation for an IT firm.

Motorola Solutions, Inc., based in Schaumburg, IL, serves the Government and Enterprise segments by designing, manufacturing, and selling communications infrastructure, devices, system software, and applications. It has about 22,000 employees around the globe and is one of the two companies that were born after the original Motorola, Inc. split in 2011. Motorola Solutions, which is the legal successor, sold its mobile business to Google, Inc. which formed a new company, based in Chicago, IL, called Motorola Mobility.

ASTRO 25 is Motorola Solutions’ core of public safety mission critical communication systems. It is the radio system used by first responders like firefighters, police officers and 911 dispatchers to communicate. Being the ASTRO Marketing Intern, I spend 80% of my time with the Global Product Management team within the System Infrastructure Operations unit, and the remaining 20% with the Global Product Marketing team.

alawamiFour days of the week, I meet with product managers and research from various resources to collect information and create new Go-To-Market material, or update old ones that no longer have valid information due to feature changes due to system updates. I find the most fun in creating new GTM material because, especially for my first project, there are valued offerings that the market is not aware of, and having GTM material for these offerings available to sales teams, means better sales opportunities and greater revenue.

Once a week, I work with the Global Product Marketing team. With this team, I learn about various marketing efforts purely run by the team. I learn about best practices to prepare for new product launches like creating brochures, multimedia and webpages. I also learn about plans and preparations prior to major exhibitions from organizing the products for display to testing the demo units. One more very interesting skill I’m learning with this team is the depth of thoughts that go in creating GTM material, not in terms of design, but in terms of information. What information goes in the material, to whom it will be presented, who will use it and when in the lifecycle of the product it will be used are just a small sample of the questions that are discussed prior to creating new GTM material and when reviewing and updating new ones.